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Is it better to compartmentalise your social media?

You’ve come up with a new project. You’re inspired by the idea and you just. Can’t. Wait. To. Start! You’re already buying domain names, and checking handle availabilities on all the relevant social media channels. But, before you seal the deal on that fresh new Twitter account, take a moment to think about whether it’s worth it.

How much of this project is really worth disassociating from all the other things about you that your followers love about you and what you represent?

For me, personally, I’ve got my “professional” social media account, and my personal one too. I barely touch my professional accounts because the idea of creating content for contents sake doesn’t feel right. I don’t want to add to the over-saturation of social media feeds just so that that me as a social media marketer stays separate to me as a person. They are, inherently, one and the same. (Plus, no doubt there’s a little bit of impostors syndrome kicking around there too.)

Compartmentalising your projects into individual channels isn’t, imo, always the best way to work with social media. Especially not when you’re a sole trader or independent business.

I recently worked with an influencer who sells her own products and also runs a concept store full of products she loves made by other creatives. Super cool! But she created a separate account for her concept store, and quickly became more dedicated to posting on that social media account than her own. Her concept store had endless resources and inspiration to draw from in order to create a seamless feed of posts, which quickly overshadowed the much smaller collection of products the she has to create content for her personal brand.

Now that she’s a year into launching her concept store, she has regular content going out to the 5k following her store’s Instagram account, but only a post here or there each month going out to her personal brand account with a following of 26k. Sure, the concept store includes products that aren’t her own – but inherently it all points to her: what she likes, what she wants other to know about and how those other products tie back into her own sense of personal branding and style.

Had she kept those two ideas in the same feed, she would have a single full and rich feed of content that promotes a number of aspects of her business.

Questions to ask yourself if you’re about to start a project

1. How closely does this project align with what people already know and like about you?
2. Is it necessary for it to be separate, or could it work to help you build your current feed?
3. Do you specifically want your name/brand to be disassociated from this project?
4. Would it turn your main feed’s audience off, or let them see a different side of you?
5. If you DO choose to compartmentalise, can you carry the burden of needing to maintain both accounts at once?
6. Is this project ongoing, or does it have an end date?

For me, I’ve realised that having an account dedicated to my “professional” work isn’t how I want people to see me. I want my personality and love of art, creativity and people to be side by side with my professional endeavours. That doesn’t mean I’m about to drop some #inspo into my friends’ feeds about creating an authentic voice – but it DOES mean that when people come to my feed from my work, they get a better idea of who I am as a person. Regardless, the decision will be different for everyone, this article is simply here to give you an opportunity to consider if compartmentalising is best for you.

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